Tag Archives: suit

Sing the blues during your next interview

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A recent CareerBuilder survey makes the connection between colors and employers’ impressions of them. Over 2,000 hiring managers and human resources professionals from a variety of industries and company sizes were surveyed.

They were asked to advise job applicants on the best color to wear to a job interview. Their top pick? Blue. (Although admittedly, blue received only 23% of the total vote.)

Your worst choice? Orange. While it’s associated with “creative”, it’s also associated with “unprofessional”.

Interview challenge: under $350

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I thought I’d give myself a small challenge today and see what it might take to suit up in pieces I might actually wear again.

I decided that sale items were fair game if they weren’t one-of-a-kind close-outs, but I made sure that the pieces I put into my hypothetical shopping bag met a certain standard–they had to be versatile enough that I would mix them in with other things I might wear once hired and they had to be good quality pieces that would stand up to scrutiny (no unlined jackets, no trousers that wrinkle if you look at them wrong, nothing that looks like it might not last a day’s wear–nothing that would go to the back of the closet and stay there for good).

What made the cut ?

I started by finding a jacket I liked that had some matching pant options. LOFT was having a sale so I gravitated to this suit, knowing that they offer a good range of sizes and that the fit and finish would be very good. Once the jacket and pants were settled, I moved on to a top. Since the jacket is an open style, I wanted a color to punch up the outfit a bit, but I didn’t want to spend money on a colored silk or poly shell which I might move to the back of my closet. I like T’s under jackets. They’re versatile and cheap and truly the Target brands are great ones (there’s no need to premium dollar here). And then it was on to accessories. Timex makes a great classic watch. Since real pearls can be had at the same price or less than many women’s retailers, I chose real ones. I opted for a pair of classic black leather pumps–in a rather non-neckbreaking height. And then, a Zara tote that looks almost as good as it would in leather.

Total cost: $341

Skirting the issue

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I confess. I’m like a deer in the headlights when it comes to dressing the skirt suit for an interview. I love the way a skirt suit can look so fabulously polished and yet, I have such an aversion to wearing “pantyhose” that it is territory that I avoid like the plague. Bare legs paired with a dress or skirt haven’t been on the “no-no” list for years here in California unless you’re in the court room or in a bank. And in my mind, they are the trappings of an older generation (not to mention that I my pumps always slip off my feet when I wear them with hosiery). However, the interview dynamic dictates that we fall back to more formal, conservative attire–so bare legs become more of a question, even if they’re something that would totally fly in the normal office environment.

I recommend that if you go the way of the skirt suit, you absolutely err on the side of hosiery for your first interview. Go skin tone. Get as close of a match as possible. As sheer as possible. Sheer black nylons were left behind in the last millennium (for good reason). And opaque tights (even in black and even if they’d totally be your go-to at the office) can make even the chicest suit look instantly matronly. Nordstrom has some good nude options that won’t break the bank. Calvin Klein has some great super sheers, too. And of course, Wolford probably offers the best of the bunch–but their prices aren’t for most budgets.

Pro-tip: Avoid stay-ups–they never do. And skip the garters/stockings combo–the fasteners can show through thinner suiting material.

Or wear trousers. I do.

Interview style recon

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It can often be difficult to figure out what exactly to wear to your first interview. And while I stand by my claim that you can’t go wrong with this number, the right outfit can vary by occupation and industry.

If you’re going to interview at a larger company and have the benefit of some spare cycles prior to your interview, a small lobby stake-out can tell you a lot about the workplace attire. However, it may not reveal what’s expected of you as an actual candidate. As an example, I worked for a number of years in the engineering arm of a high profile software/hardware startup. While I wore jeans, company logoed unisex tees, and Keds to work, my expectations were that everyone I interviewed would come prepped and dressed to show me their interview dance. Even in that most laid-back environment, a suit was a given for at least the first round and the absence of one didn’t go without remark.

Cue Glassdoor.com. Although I have visited Glassdoor before, it wasn’t until today that I had noticed that some users were including comments on attire. The volume of posts that include style comments is low, but it could lend some insight into what you can expect. You need to join if you want to view more than ten reviews but accounts are free so there’s not much to lose. And, Glassdoor reviews cover a wealth of meatier topics that can help you know what to expect and get you prepped for questions.

In the wild: marketing consultant

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What just walked through my door? Our marketing consultant in an Ann Taylor outfit that kills it.

In the wild: marketing consultant

What made this ensemble sing? The blush shell (almost like the one shown but with no embellishments at the neckline) and a rose-gold Michael Kors chronograph watch worked to soften up the brown suit and were spot on compliments to her skin tone and hair color. The large tote (again, almost a match to the one she was carrying) was large enough to let her slip her laptop inside-she was our PowerPoint queen-eliminating the need to lug along a clunky and ugly company issued laptop bag.